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blackfeministmusic:

Mary J Blige “Family Affair” 

When folks first heard this song, we were all “Um, Mary what is a hateration or holleration?” Then, we was like, “fuck it, the song is good, just dance.” This song was Mary shaking off the problems, and letting loose with family. 

Better yet, wtf is a dancerie? 

But this is still the jam.

(via vivanlosancestros)

To Become A Woman Is To Become A Whore

By Akynos
Who knew that becoming a woman involves becoming a whore?
In these modern times, the sexual freedom of women has been so constrained that the only way to be deemed upstanding is to adopt a virgin mother persona.
Respectable women don’t swear or sleep around. Their entire lives are to be spent hanging onto the hope of marrying some man of their sad dreams and obtaining some bloodsucking job, all the while reserving their sexual energy for this one man—forever. One man who, I may add, due to the perplexing double standard of our society, may deem it his divine right to fuck any woman he damn well pleases, because he is a man.
[Continue reading article at ravishly.]

To Become A Woman Is To Become A Whore

By Akynos

Who knew that becoming a woman involves becoming a whore?

In these modern times, the sexual freedom of women has been so constrained that the only way to be deemed upstanding is to adopt a virgin mother persona.

Respectable women don’t swear or sleep around. Their entire lives are to be spent hanging onto the hope of marrying some man of their sad dreams and obtaining some bloodsucking job, all the while reserving their sexual energy for this one man—forever. One man who, I may add, due to the perplexing double standard of our society, may deem it his divine right to fuck any woman he damn well pleases, because he is a man.

[Continue reading article at ravishly.]

soulbrotherv2:

Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism by James W. Loewen

No blacks allowed, especially after dark. This was the unwritten rule in a “sundown” town. In his trademark revelatory style, bestselling author James W. Loewen explores one of America’s best-kept secrets as he unearths the making of sundown towns and discloses the fact that many white neighborhoods and suburbs are the result of years of racism and segregation. Anna, Illinois; Darien, Connecticut; and Cedar Key, Florida, are just a few examples of the thousands of all-white towns established between 1890 and 1968, many of which still exist today. White residents of these towns used any means possible — including the law, harassment, race riots, and even murder — to keep African Americans and other minority groups out.
Powerful and unprecedented, Sundown Towns tells the story of how these towns came into existence, what maintains them, and what to do about them. It also deepens our understanding of the role racism has played and continues to play in our society.

soulbrotherv2:

Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism by James W. Loewen

No blacks allowed, especially after dark. This was the unwritten rule in a “sundown” town. In his trademark revelatory style, bestselling author James W. Loewen explores one of America’s best-kept secrets as he unearths the making of sundown towns and discloses the fact that many white neighborhoods and suburbs are the result of years of racism and segregation. Anna, Illinois; Darien, Connecticut; and Cedar Key, Florida, are just a few examples of the thousands of all-white towns established between 1890 and 1968, many of which still exist today. White residents of these towns used any means possible — including the law, harassment, race riots, and even murder — to keep African Americans and other minority groups out.

Powerful and unprecedented, Sundown Towns tells the story of how these towns came into existence, what maintains them, and what to do about them. It also deepens our understanding of the role racism has played and continues to play in our society.

(via soulbrotherv2)

soulbrotherv2:

Tennessee & The Black Mule | The Injustice Files: Sundown Towns

Some time ago I recommended James W. Loewen’s book, Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism.  Recently, Discovery Investigation’s series, The Injustice Files, explored this historical and, seemingly, current phenomenon.

If you are interested, the complete episode can be found on You Tube.

Nevertheless, do not sleep on this series, The Injustice Files on Discovery Investigation.

soulbrotherv2:

After Ferguson, the Play Bulrusher Feels Timely in Its Portrayal of Race Relations (GO!)

By Rebecca Haithcoat
“Why do you live where they do this to colored people?” asks 18-year-old Bulrusher, who grew up one of two black people in pastoral yet progressive Boonville, California. It’s the summer of 1955, and Vera, who’s just off a train from Birmingham, has shown her new friend a magazine photo of Emmett Till’s mutilated face. 
“’Cause we’re tired of running,” Vera replies. 
Eisa Davis’ Bulrusher, which was a Pulitzer Prize finalist, was first produced almost a decade ago. But with most of the country riveted by Ferguson, Missouri, where an unarmed black teenager recently was shot and killed by a police officer, this exchange could not feel timelier or more chilling.
[Continue reading article at the LA Weekly Blog.]

soulbrotherv2:

After Ferguson, the Play Bulrusher Feels Timely in Its Portrayal of Race Relations (GO!)

By Rebecca Haithcoat

“Why do you live where they do this to colored people?” asks 18-year-old Bulrusher, who grew up one of two black people in pastoral yet progressive Boonville, California. It’s the summer of 1955, and Vera, who’s just off a train from Birmingham, has shown her new friend a magazine photo of Emmett Till’s mutilated face. 

“’Cause we’re tired of running,” Vera replies. 

Eisa Davis’ Bulrusher, which was a Pulitzer Prize finalist, was first produced almost a decade ago. But with most of the country riveted by Ferguson, Missouri, where an unarmed black teenager recently was shot and killed by a police officer, this exchange could not feel timelier or more chilling.

[Continue reading article at the LA Weekly Blog.]

soulbrotherv2:

Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It by James Ciment 
In 1820, a group of about eighty African Americans reversed the course of history and sailed back to Africa, to a place they would name after liberty itself. They went under the banner of the American Colonization Society, a white philanthropic organization with a dual agenda: to rid America of its blacks, and to convert Africans to Christianity.
The settlers staked out a beachhead; their numbers grew as more boats arrived; and after breaking free from their white overseers, they founded Liberia—Africa’s first black republic—in 1847.
James Ciment’s Another America is the first full account of this dramatic experiment. With empathy and a sharp eye for human foibles, Ciment reveals that the Americo-Liberians struggled to live up to their high ideals. 
[book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It by James Ciment 

In 1820, a group of about eighty African Americans reversed the course of history and sailed back to Africa, to a place they would name after liberty itself. They went under the banner of the American Colonization Society, a white philanthropic organization with a dual agenda: to rid America of its blacks, and to convert Africans to Christianity.

The settlers staked out a beachhead; their numbers grew as more boats arrived; and after breaking free from their white overseers, they founded Liberia—Africa’s first black republic—in 1847.

James Ciment’s Another America is the first full account of this dramatic experiment. With empathy and a sharp eye for human foibles, Ciment reveals that the Americo-Liberians struggled to live up to their high ideals. 

[book link]