Eternally Beautifully Black

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soulbrotherv2:

"Love takes off the masks that we fear we cannot live without and know we  cannot live within.  I use the word "Love" here not merely in the personal sense but as a state of being or a state of grace—not in the infantile American sense of being made happy but in the tough and universal sense of quest and daring and growth." — James Baldwin

soulbrotherv2:

"Love takes off the masks that we fear we cannot live without and know we  cannot live within.  I use the word "Love" here not merely in the personal sense but as a state of being or a state of grace—not in the infantile American sense of being made happy but in the tough and universal sense of quest and daring and growth." — James Baldwin

Did You Know Black Women Lead ALL Groups in College Enrollment? Watch This!

by Britni Danielle
Filmmaker Janks Morton and the folks over at Black and Married With Kids are at it again. In the latest episode of the web series, Truths You Won’t Believe, Morton shares yet another startling fact about Black women the media continues to ignore.
Despite the misconceptions and stereotypes about African American women, we are making great strides in education. In addition to half of all Black women ages 18-24 pursuing higher degrees, Black women are beating out ALL other groups, no matter the race or gender, when it comes to overall college enrollment.

[Read entire article at Clutch magazine.]

Did You Know Black Women Lead ALL Groups in College Enrollment? Watch This!

by Britni Danielle

Filmmaker Janks Morton and the folks over at Black and Married With Kids are at it again. In the latest episode of the web series, Truths You Won’t BelieveMorton shares yet another startling fact about Black women the media continues to ignore.

Despite the misconceptions and stereotypes about African American women, we are making great strides in education. In addition to half of all Black women ages 18-24 pursuing higher degrees, Black women are beating out ALL other groups, no matter the race or gender, when it comes to overall college enrollment.

[Read entire article at Clutch magazine.]

soulbrotherv2:

Living for the City: Migration, Education, and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture) by Donna Murch
In this nuanced and groundbreaking history, Donna Murch argues that the Black Panther Party (BPP) started with a study group. Drawing on oral history and untapped archival sources, she explains how a relatively small city with a recent history of African American settlement produced such compelling and influential forms of Black Power politics. 
During an era of expansion and political struggle in California’s system of public higher education, black southern migrants formed the BPP. In the early 1960s, attending Merritt College and other public universities radicalized Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, and many of the young people who joined the Panthers’ rank and file. In the face of social crisis and police violence, the most disfranchised sectors of the East Bay’s African American community—young, poor, and migrant—challenged the legitimacy of state authorities and of an older generation of black leadership. By excavating this hidden history,Living for the City broadens the scholarship of the Black Power movement by documenting the contributions of black students and youth who created new forms of organization, grassroots mobilization, and political literacy. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Living for the City: Migration, Education, and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture) by Donna Murch

In this nuanced and groundbreaking history, Donna Murch argues that the Black Panther Party (BPP) started with a study group. Drawing on oral history and untapped archival sources, she explains how a relatively small city with a recent history of African American settlement produced such compelling and influential forms of Black Power politics. 

During an era of expansion and political struggle in California’s system of public higher education, black southern migrants formed the BPP. In the early 1960s, attending Merritt College and other public universities radicalized Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, and many of the young people who joined the Panthers’ rank and file. In the face of social crisis and police violence, the most disfranchised sectors of the East Bay’s African American community—young, poor, and migrant—challenged the legitimacy of state authorities and of an older generation of black leadership. By excavating this hidden history,Living for the City broadens the scholarship of the Black Power movement by documenting the contributions of black students and youth who created new forms of organization, grassroots mobilization, and political literacy. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Great opportunity for young leaders:  
CBCF Congressional Internship Program
Program Overview
Established in 1986, the CBCF Congressional Internship Program answered the call to help diversify our democracy by increasing the pool of talented public servants. This intensive nine-week summer program offers the opportunity for college students from across the nation to learn about the legislative process, leadership and careers in the policy making process.  Interns work in CBC member offices, attend professional development events, and participate in leadership development projects. The program prepares young people to become informed decision makers and influential leaders who shape our world. This program is offered every summer.
Benefits
Interns will receive a $3,000 stipend
Housing at a local university (all expenses covered)
Interns may be eligible to receive academic credit at their college or university for participating in the program
Eligibility
U.S. citizen or permit to work in the U.S.
Currently or recently (within the past 12 months) enrolled in college full-time when applying for program
Have a minimum GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
Be at least a college sophomore by the internship start date
Demonstrated interest in public service, governance, and policy-making process

soulbrotherv2:

Great opportunity for young leaders:  

CBCF Congressional Internship Program

Program Overview

Established in 1986, the CBCF Congressional Internship Program answered the call to help diversify our democracy by increasing the pool of talented public servants. This intensive nine-week summer program offers the opportunity for college students from across the nation to learn about the legislative process, leadership and careers in the policy making process.  Interns work in CBC member offices, attend professional development events, and participate in leadership development projects. The program prepares young people to become informed decision makers and influential leaders who shape our world. This program is offered every summer.

Benefits

  • Interns will receive a $3,000 stipend
  • Housing at a local university (all expenses covered)
  • Interns may be eligible to receive academic credit at their college or university for participating in the program

Eligibility

  • U.S. citizen or permit to work in the U.S.
  • Currently or recently (within the past 12 months) enrolled in college full-time when applying for program
  • Have a minimum GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
  • Be at least a college sophomore by the internship start date
  • Demonstrated interest in public service, governance, and policy-making process

soulbrotherv2:

Utopia - A film by John Pilger - Official trailer

One of the most extraordinary films about Australia is soon to be released in the UK. This is Utopia, an epic production by the Emmy and Bafta winning film-maker and journalist John Pilger.

Utopia is a vast region in northern Australia and home to the oldest human presence on earth. “This film is a journey into that secret country,” says Pilger in Utopia. “It will describe not only the uniqueness of the first Australians, but their trail of tears and betrayal and resistance - from one utopia to another.”

soulbrotherv2:

Traveling While Black

By FARAI CHIDEYA
As I walked through the Forbidden City, the majestic imperial palace at the center of Beijing, with a friend and her teenager, I scanned the crowd. In the maze of shrines and courtyards, there was no one quite like us: I am an African-American with long dreadlocks, and my friend, Maria, a Mexican-American, had her half-Dominican son in tow.
And yet, we were nearly invisible — at least to the guards checking the bags of Chinese tourists, possibly for materials that could be used in protests at this landmark, which adjoins Tiananmen Square. We passed through checkpoint after checkpoint unhindered, while Chinese people were stopped and their bags searched. Sure, we got a couple of stares from people. But no one touched our hair, pointed or acted hostile — which has happened to me as a tourist even in the United States. Once again, my travels had taken me to a place — not just a physical but a mental place — where the rules as I knew them had changed.
[Continue reading article in its entirety at the New York Times.]

soulbrotherv2:

Traveling While Black

By FARAI CHIDEYA

As I walked through the Forbidden City, the majestic imperial palace at the center of Beijing, with a friend and her teenager, I scanned the crowd. In the maze of shrines and courtyards, there was no one quite like us: I am an African-American with long dreadlocks, and my friend, Maria, a Mexican-American, had her half-Dominican son in tow.

And yet, we were nearly invisible — at least to the guards checking the bags of Chinese tourists, possibly for materials that could be used in protests at this landmark, which adjoins Tiananmen Square. We passed through checkpoint after checkpoint unhindered, while Chinese people were stopped and their bags searched. Sure, we got a couple of stares from people. But no one touched our hair, pointed or acted hostile — which has happened to me as a tourist even in the United States. Once again, my travels had taken me to a place — not just a physical but a mental place — where the rules as I knew them had changed.

[Continue reading article in its entirety at the New York Times.]